Screenwriter Profile: Woody Allen

The Writer:

Woody Allen has a style all his own. You always know when you’re watching a Woody Allen film — usually because he’s also starring in it, and directing. But these giveaways aside, Allen has an undeniably unique voice and a quirky sense of humor that has set him apart as one of the great screenwriters of our time.

Credits:

Nero Fiddled (screenplay) (post-production) – 2012

Midnight in Paris (written by) – 2011

You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger (written by) – 2010

Sdelka (short) (play) – 2009

Whatever Works (written by) – 2009

Vicky Cristina Barcelona (written by) – 2008

Cassandra’s Dream (written by) – 2007

Scoop (written by) – 2006

Match Point (written by) – 2005

Melinda and Melinda (written by) – 2004

Anything Else (written by) – 2003

Hollywood Ending (written by) – 2002

Sounds from a Town I Love (TV short) – 2001

The Curse of the Jade Scorpion (written by) – 2001

Small Time Crooks (written by) – 2000

Sweet and Lowdown (written by) -1999

Celebrity (written by) – 1998

Deconstructing Harry (written by) – 1997

Count Mercury Goes to the Suburbs (short) (story “Count Dracula”) – 1997

Everyone Says I Love You (written by) – 1996

Mighty Aphrodite (written by) – 1995

Une aspirine pour deux (TV movie) (play) – 1995

Don’t Drink the Water (TV movie) (play / teleplay) – 1994

Bullets Over Broadway (written by) – 1994

Manhattan Murder Mystery (written by) – 1993

Husbands and Wives (written by) – 1992

Shadows and Fog (written by) – 1991

Alice (written by) – 1990

Crimes and Misdemeanors (written by) – 1989

New York Stories (written by / segment “Oedipus Wrecks”) – 1989

Somebody or The Rise and Fall of Philosophy (short) (story “Mr Big”) – 1989

Another Woman (written by) – 1988

September (written by) – 1987

Radio Days (written by) – 1987

Hannah and Her Sisters (written by) – 1986

Meeting Woody Allen (documentary short) – 1986

The Purple Rose of Cairo (written by) – 1985

Broadway Danny Rose (written by) – 1984

Zelig (written by) – 1983

A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy (written by) – 1982

The Subtil Concept (short) (story “Mr Big”) – 1981

Stardust Memories (written by) – 1980

Manhattan (written by) – 1979

Interiors (written by) – 1978

Annie Hall (written by) – 1977

Love and Death (written by) – 1975

Sleeper (written by) – 1973

Every Thing You Always Wanted to Know About Sex * But Were Afraid to Ask (written for the screen by) – 1972

Play It Again, Sam (play / screenplay) – 1972

Bananas (written by) – 1971

Men of Crisis: The Harvey Wallinger Story (TV short) – 1971

Pussycat, Pussycat, I Love You (screenplay “What’s New, Pussycat?”) – 1970

Don’t Drink the Water (play / screenplay) – 1969

The Kraft Music Hall (TV series) – 1967-69

– The Woody Allen Special (1969) (writer)

– Woody Allen Looks at 1967 (1967) (Woody Allen’s material)

Take the Money and Run (original screenplay) – 1969

Casino Royale (uncredited) – 1967

The World: Color It Happy (TV movie) (written by) – 1967

What’s Up, Tiger Lily? – 1966

Gene Kelly in New York, New York (TV movie) – 1966

What’s New Pussycat (original screenplay) – 1965

The Sid Caesar Show (TV series) (uncredited) – 1963

The Laughmaker (short) – 1962

Hooray for Love (TV movie) – 1960

Candid Camera (TV series) – 1960

At the Movies (TV movie) – 1959

The Garry Moore Show (TV series) – 1958

Stanley (TV series) – 1956

The Colgate Comedy Hour (TV Series) – 1950

Quotes:

My relationship with Hollywood isn’t love-hate, it’s love-contempt. I’ve never had to suffer any of the indignities that one associates with the studio system. I’ve always been independent in New York by sheer good luck. But I have an affection for Hollywood because I’ve had so much pleasure from films that have come out of there. Not a whole lot of them, but a certain amount of them have been very meaningful to me.

The two biggest myths about me are that I’m an intellectual, because I wear these glasses, and that I’m an artist because my films lose money. Those two myths have been prevalent for many years.

I don’t want to achieve immortality through my work. I want to achieve it by not dying.

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