Screenwriter Profile: Ted Elliott & Terry Rossio

Terry+Rossio+World+Premiere+Walt+Disney+Pirates+cfb0Uk8MH_DlThe Writers:

Writing team Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio are the highest grossing screenwriters of all time. They’ve written a number of films for Disney including Shrek, Aladdin, and The Pirates of the Caribbean films. These guys are in their early fifties, and it looks like they have decades more of amazing stories in front of them.

Credits:

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (characters) (announced) – 2016

The Lone Ranger (screen story) / (screenplay) – 2013

Lovestruck: The Musical (TV Movie) – 2013

Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (characters) / (screenplay) – 2011

Turbo Dates (TV Series) – 2009-2011

National Treasure: Book of Secrets (story) – 2007

Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End (characters) / (written by) – 2007

Deja Vu (written by) – 2006

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest (characters) / (written by) – 2006

The Legend of Zorro (story) – 2005

Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (screen story) / (screenplay) – 2003

Shrek (screenplay) – 2001

The Road to El Dorado (screenplay) – 2000

The Mask of Zorro (screenplay) / (story) – 1998

Small Soldiers (written by) – 1998

The Puppet Masters (screenplay) – 1994

Aladdin (screenplay) – 1992

Little Monsters (written by) – 1989

Quotes:

Turn in the first draft on the first day of shooting – that’s the goal. (Elliott)

I’ve come to believe that making a film is like a massive version of throwing a dinner party – you invite a lot of people and hope that it turns out good, but you can’t really control it. And after everyone has left and you’ve got this big mess, you wonder if all the work was worth it, why you went to all the trouble. (Rossio)

The most important commandment is to sustain interest—if you do that, everything else follows; you can move people emotionally, you can make them laugh, you can do all sorts of things. It’s most important to demonstrate character complexity or to let characters do things that create interest, because that’s how we live our lives day to day. (Rossio)

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