Posts tagged ‘how to pitch a script’

April 27, 2011

Pitchfests: Are They Worth It?

This is a question that I don’t have an aswer to. And I am genuinely interested in the answer. The Great American Pitchfest is coming up in Los Angeles, and everything I’ve read says its the best of the best when it comes to pitchfests, but I’ve also read that all pitchfests are scams.

Frankly I don’t know where the truth is, and I would love some insight.

One great thing about the Great American Pitchfest is that the day before is filled with FREE classes that can be attended by anyone who registers in advance. I plan to attend some of these classes, both to learn about pitching and to hopefully meet some fellow writers.

I’ve never actually pitched a script to anyone who could do something about it, and I dread the experience. I look forward to the chance to learn a bit more about the art of pitching and hopefully take away some of the fears I associate with it.

The Pitchfest itself, on the otherhand, is an opportunity to meet dozens of producers and agents and to give them your pitch. The question is, are these 12-20 conversations worth the minimum $250 fee to get in?

If you’ve attended this or another pitchfest before, please share your experience! I’m dying to learn more, and I’m sure others are as well.

April 12, 2011

An Interview with Master of Story, Robert McKee

Robert McKee, author of the widely renowned Story is set to give a session at the Great American Pitchfest in June. The Pitchfest recently interviewed him on the art of pitching, and here is what he had to say:

The Great American Screenwriter: There are a lot of pitching venues out there — and you have an exhausting schedule. What enticed you to speak at the Great American Pitchfest? There are a lot of mistaken ideas and foolishness around the whole business of pitching. A lot of people are setting themselves up as experts in this business and there’s a lot of information about that coming back to me from my students. There’s a sense of fallacy circulating about pitching and the way one goes about it and what they’re looking for. Look, if a company says they’re seeking romantic comedies but they hear a great and compelling pitch for a smart thriller, they’re not going to ignore that smart thriller. They want great material.

No matter what the genre, the key is to pitch well. But the hardest thing for a writer is to understand their own story. Don’t underestimate the essence of the story. In my session for the Great American Pitchfest we’ll discuss three important components for pitching.

1. You’ll discover the truth of your story. If you can’t find one you may be in a state of self-deception. You may not have a story.

2. How to judge whether you’re ready to pitch or not.

3. I will dissuade you from the notion that a pitch is a song and dance. You can razzle dazzle and bullshit your way through a pitch, but these development execs know how to pick a story out of all that song and dance. So just tell your story. This all goes back to knowing what your story truly is. You need to know the essence of it.

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